Wednesday, May 30, 2012

So, we work REALLY FRICKEN HARD to lose weight and exercise, with all those odds against us, work on issues, see specialists, read and learn, weep and try again when we fall...WORK HARD AS HECK to lose 50, 100, 150+ pounds...and they still think less of us? People! That's CRAZY!

New research out of the University of Hawaii at Mānoa, The University of Manchester and Monash University, has revealed that anti-fat prejudice still persisted against former obese women, even after they had lost a significant amount of weight.

Personal note:  I had a bunless double cheeseburger yesterday with a salad with gorgonzola, apples, and walnuts plus papaya for meal one. Pretty caloric. Then,  I had egg whites with shredded cheddar and a cameo apple with some walnuts and coconut water for meal two. I went a bit over 2100 calories. And I'm up one pound. Not pleased, but also not feeling terribly guilty. The depression makes me a bit apathetic. Not good. But as I'm not into self-flagellation, anyway, that's fine. I simply state it. Poor portion control.
But moving on....

11 comments:

Thrice Blessed said...

Wow, I find that hard to believe.

safire said...

Tomorrow is a new day! One off day is not going to derail it. It sounds like you are already moving ahead and dealing with it. I think that's the mentality to have even though it is hard not to let it become a snowball effect.

I'm reading the article right now! I think people like to make themselves feel better by bashing other people for any reason!

screaming fatgirl said...

I wonder if all of the statistics about regaining might be playing into the perceptions. They may feel that a previous fat woman who is now thin has a 95% chance of being a fat woman again. They may feel that, fundamentally, we cannot change.

It's actually unimportant. It doesn't matter what other people think of us. We don't lose weight for them or to gain their regard or respect. We do it for our health and well-being. This is one of the reasons that I do not discuss weight loss with anyone except my husband. It simply is not an issue that I feel other people need to be a part of. It's private and I only speak of it anonymously.

PlumPetals said...

The fat-stigma, as unfortunate as it is, doesn't surprise me. There are stigmas against anyone who doesn't fit into the mainstream image, just in varying degrees.

I am surprised that the stigma persists after weight loss.

Still, negative thoughts and comments can't replace that feeling of success and confidence that comes from knowing that you had the discipline and the strength to lose weight!

By the way, you posted your age in the comments of another blogger -- shock!! I would have put you 10 years younger for sure. For sure! You look amazing :)

RedPanda said...

The study about stigma against the formerly fat is disturbing, but I think it makes some sense.

I was just wondering if I would feel differently about someone if I found out they were, say, a recovering alcoholic, or had overcome a gambling problem. I hate to say it, but I would - I would think of them as weak to have had that problem in the first place.

My colleagues often remark on, or "tease" me, about my food and the fact that I'm often lugging around a gym bag. I just smile politely, never letting on that I'm a former fatty (not that it's any of their business anyway, as Screaming Fat Girl says).

Now I think that's a wise move - a self-preservation instinct kicking in.

Another thought...

I wonder if all of the statistics about regaining might be playing into the perceptions. They may feel that a previous fat woman who is now thin has a 95% chance of being a fat woman again. They may feel that, fundamentally, we cannot change.

Are the recidivism rates for dieting out there in the mainstream though? I thought this was only spoken about in the weight loss blogosphere?

Jan@WritingToWellness said...

The study seems a bit flimsy to me. Having "young" people (probably meaning college sophomores in psych classes) is not very meaningful compared to people who actually know those who have lost weight. I wonder if they asked about their experiences with dieters... No matter, it's one study, and who gives a rat's ass what others think any more. It's my body, my health.

And, you do know that 2100 calories will not cause you to gain a pound of fat, right? Daily fluctuations drive me wild. I really try to focus on waist size rather than weight, but stepping on that scale is just too darn easy! Perhaps during this time of being depressed, using the scale less often will let you focus on your eating and fitness behavior. Just a thought.

Jane Cartelli said...

I believe it but I do not think their study is wide enough. They seem to be focused on where people knew the person before and after. I do not find any prejudice against me with people who did not know me fat. ALTHOUGH, I find that some obese people who are still obese and knew me as larger than they are DO have prejudice against me as a thinner person (while they are still fat).

I do have one comment on your food from yesterday. I notice there was a lot of cheese in there: on the burger, in the salad, in the eggs. Do you usually look for a fatty/creamy texture in your food? That was my go-to texture for many years. I couldn't even imagine why anyone would eat a burger without cheese.
Isn't it great to know we can change?

RedPanda said...

This study is now receiving coverage in Australia.

http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/beauty/women-cant-escape-obesity-stigma-20120601-1zlj0.html

The comments are fairly predictable.

InWeighOverMyHead said...

those are still better choices than most of us make. :)

mybizzykitchen.com said...

Hang in there - it was only one burger, and life is too short not to have a double cheeseburger every once in a while! :D

Julie said...

Just checking in Mir. I hope that this week is better. You've done so well, come so very far and only have a sprint left. You can do this. I KNOW YOU CAN!!! Take care my friend and have a blessed day!